[Note: many of our climate resources originally come from the blog of PhD climatologist Brian Brettschneider. If you like his work, go check him out and give him some traffic!]

Did you know that northern latitudes actually average more daylight hours per year than southern latitudes? This means that if you live in the far north, those long summer days more than make up for the long winter nights.

This is also a key piece of data for those planning for solar panels. The daylight hours may not be as evenly distributed across the year as they are at the equator, but you have more total hours of daylight across the year in which your panels are making power and perhaps saving you money (if you have a grid-tie).

Here’s the US Map showing final average calculations:

Click image for full resolution. Click here for original source.

The above image is the annual total for the year averaged out across the days. For the hours of daylight and daylight + civil twilight on the longest day of the year, the next two maps tell a little bit more.

Click image for full resolution. Click here for original source.

Click image for full resolution. Click here for original source.

Why does it work out like this? The next graph explains a bit.

As you look, the horizontal tells how far north of the equator you are, and the vertical shows yearly average of daylight hours, with a few example cities plotted as vertical lines.

Click image for full resolution. Click here for original source.

If you must know the complete astronomical explanation, you can read it at Brian B’s blog, who created the original images.